Offerings Wedge

wedge

Think of your entire suite as an offerings wedge, with your deepest expertise placed at the thin edge. As you move back from the thin edge you have your less specialised offerings, with your most commoditised offerings – the things that you do but everyone else does too, at the rear-most, broadest end of the wedge. For even specialist firms these broader offerings can account for a large percentage of the firm’s income.

The specialist, front edge of your wedge is relevant to the fewest clients-to-be. At the very back are those generalist services that almost everyone needs.

The natural inclination when calling into a client-to-be is to present as much of the wedge to him as possible. By throwing it at him sideways you are able to showcase the breadth of your offerings to him, hoping that he has a need for at least one of your services. Mathematically, you should stand a better chance of matching need to service by presenting this side edge of the wedge first.

Your next best option is to present the back end of the wedge, where you would be leading with just one offering but it would be one for which many companies have a need.

We all know what a spear looks like and how it works. And that’s exactly how you should think of your wedge of offerings.  When done properly, it is the tip of the spear that pierces the client-to-be’s resistance and leads to a meaningful conversation, which in turn leads to an open assessment of whether or not there is a fit.

This is all we really want from our telephone introduction: to introduce your firm to a targeted client-to-be and have a meaningful exploration of whether one party has the expertise to help with the others’ needs.

This is an extract (with minor Anglicisation) from an article by Blair Enns of Win Without Pitching – the full article can be found HERE.